Thursday, March 22, 2012

Dominican Slang

Their are certain Spanish phrases and words that are used only on this island. Also among other Dominicans in the diaspora. Sometimes I hear something, and I think, what the fuck are they talking about? I am used to the ones I hear spoken everyday. Just listening to conversations you will hear, "Dame Lu," "Vaina/Baina," "Chin," "Chulo," "Que lo Que," "Manin," "Jevi," and that is just a few. But those are local Dominicanisms. If you want to find out what those words and other sayings mean. There are some great websites that break it down. This website has the word and meaing in English. But it also has a feature where you can hear how it is pronounced. This website is a great dictonary. The meaning is in Spanish and English, but they also use it in a sentence so that you can see it is used. And this website has a more detailed expanation of the how and the why. Along with a great selection of words. If you heard an expression and didn't know what it meant, these websites can help. 

9 Comments:

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written by Brien on March 23, 2012

My favorite is 'que lo que' and in NY, whenever they are upset, they keep spewing se baina. Then I turn to the news to brush up on my Spanish, and I never hear those words or phrases. thanks for pointing this out, manito!
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written by Jeff on March 23, 2012

I will certainly check this site out. I already love the slang style that is already inherent in the Domican form of spanish. After all isn't it true that Spain's spanish is the proper way to speak spanish. Therefore that would suggest that any other form of spanish is a result of slang being added to it...
I can't wait to hear what Domincans deem slang added to their already slang form of spanish sounds like. I bet it is "sexy" as hell...
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written by Brien on March 23, 2012

Jeff,
Languages change, just as much as people do. After centuries, I doubt one country can claim their's is the proper way to speak, in any language. Much the same way the English cannot claim they speak proper English as opposed to the American. All countries add to the richness of their language as others contribute to it.
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written by Diandra on March 23, 2012

That info was invaluable. Unfortunately they speak much too fast to even hear it. I really love some of the expressions, but again when trying to decipher the Spanish (when spoken by most) it kinda sounds like BRRRRRRRRLALALA!
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written by Brent on March 23, 2012

Very Interesting remarks!
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written by Brent on March 23, 2012

Very Interesting remarks! I will learn this
Spanish slang daily.
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written by anon on March 25, 2012

Sicote!!
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written by Carlos on March 26, 2012

horripilante is a correct spanish word and means horrifying. Nitido is a correct word and means clear.
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written by RICH on March 26, 2012

Yup too bad i just came across this article. I was just there two weeks ago and OGM, " Sicote" was the phrase of the week. Dudes be wearing running shoes without socks in that heat. OMG, "SICOTE"
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POSTED BY MONAGA AT 03:13 PM

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